Choosing Better Canned Tuna Products With a Swipe on an App!

If you’re a canned tuna lover and you find making the right choice in the seafood aisle a challenge, Greenpeace Canada has a tool that can help.

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Choosing Better Canned Tuna Products With a Swipe on an App!

If you’re a canned tuna lover and you find making the right choice in the seafood aisle a challenge, Greenpeace Canada has a tool that can help. We’ve created a Sustainable Canned Tuna Guide app for your phone that gives you quick tips on which products to avoid and which are better options. And we’ve just updated it, so download it now!

You’ll find a few more green-rated products this year, as new products have hit store shelves across the country. Ocean Naturals, a brand that first popped up on US store shelves, now offers pole and line and FAD-free skipjack and pole and troll caught albacore.

Choices Market’s Earth’s Choice brand skipjack and albacore have been upgraded from red to yellow after the company switched to more sustainable fishing methods for these products. The company still does lack an overall sustainability policy that would ensure products continue to be sourced sustainably and socially responsibly, and its simplypure brand doesn’t yet measure up.  

Even Canada’s biggest and most unsustainable brand, Clover Leaf, is trying to join the eco-party by offering a more sustainable product called Wild Selections that will hit stores this month.

But some products have also received a downgrading or have been removed altogether. One of Canada’s biggest brands, Gold Seal, was downgraded in the app from yellow to red for its failure to meet its 2015 commitment to provide 100% sustainably-caught skipjack.

Three of Overwaitea Food Group’s Western Family products (tongol, skipjack and albacore) not caught by more sustainable fishing methods were downgraded to red from yellow for the company’s failure to work towards its commitment to source 100% sustainable tuna by the end of 2015. Its green-rated products were downgraded to yellow for the same reason. Sobeys, now parent company of Canada Safeway, discontinued Safeway brand FAD-free skipjack this year, meaning there are now no more sustainable house brands options available to its customers.

The app contains over 100 canned tuna products sold at supermarkets, farmers’ markets, convenience stores and elsewhere across Canada. The products in the app were assessed in three main areas, including the health of the tuna species, the sustainability of the fishing method used, and whether the company has a commitment to only source sustainable and ethical tuna. Products are given an overall rating of green (better option), yellow (work in progress) or red (bad option).  So if you’re going to buy canned tuna, and your go-to brand is rated red, support better brands!

Click here to download the app now!

When you download the updated app, don’t forget to take action! Greenpeace is targeting the world’s largest producer of canned tuna, Thai Union, for its destructive and irresponsible sourcing practices and its failure to ensure sustainable and socially responsible products. A lot of the canned tuna sold in Canada is supplied by Thai Union. Help us change the tuna industry by starting with the biggest player.